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Trade Notices

Ace Global Lines, the regions "1st Niche Tank Carrier” launches the “ACETANK Middle East Xpress” shuttle dedicated to Chemical Exporters in the Middle East.

A journey of a thousand miles, starts with “one small step” !

The Middle East Region has regularly experienced an acute shortage of “dedicated” Liquid Bulk Solutions providers. This is well documented in a number of well-known trade periodicals, by a host of industry experts. Ace Global Lines DWC-LLC, registered at the visionary city of Dubai, took on the onerous challenge to bridge the gap and launched the regions "1st Niche Tank Carrier”, with a goal to provide dedicated customers with “simplified" and “customized" liquid bulk transport solutions.

The new "ACETANK Middle East Xpress” tank container shuttle service launched in Jan 2014, with a large fleet of “Industry Best Standard" ISO Tanks containers, was extremely well received by the Chemical & Liquid Bulk Transport Industry. The trade is generally well aware of the fact that “Tank Container Operations” are very high cost intensive, as ISO Tanks are built to the highest safety standards with the highest quality surgical-grade stainless steel in the world.

Customers were very appreciative of the fact that they now have a “Niche Tank Carrier" with a “regional heart”, who understands their requirements and can customize solutions based on their transport budgets. This much needed investment by ACE In the “ACETANK Middle East Express ” shuttle service, is a humble attempt to fill one of the holes in the challenging Middle East liquid bulk market.

Ace Global Lines DWC-LLC, is overwhelmed with the response from the trade and makes a pledge to support our customers in the region with “Value For Money”. We are extremely delighted to provide a simple platform for connecting the region’s No.1 Logistics Hub of “Dubai & DWC”….. with the Globe. Encouraged by the response, ACE is planning a number of service expansions in the near future.

We welcome customer bookings and enquiries on info@acegloballines.com & kiran@acegloballines.com.

The Ace Global Lines Team.
January 2014.


DP World lays foundation stone for new terminal at Jnpt-India.

Mumbai, India, Dubai, United Arab Emirates: A major milestone in the development of the new DP World terminal at India’s premier gateway port, Jawaharlal Nehru Port, was achieved today with the ceremonial laying of the foundation stone by the Honourable Minister of Shipping Shri GK Vasan

The ceremony at the Nhava Sheva (India) Gateway Terminal site was held in the presence of the Honourable Minister of State for Shipping, Shri Milind Deora, the Chairman DP World, HE Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem, and HE Shri NN Kumar, Chairman of Jawaharlal Nehru Port, along with dignitaries from the Government of India, senior members of Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust and DP World, and the Indian trade community.

HE Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem, Chairman, DP World, said: “Today is an important milestone for us and we thank the Honourable Minister Shri GK Vasan for laying the foundation stone for the Nhava Sheva (India) Gateway Terminal. The new development would not have been possible without the dedication and commitment of the Government of India to India’s trade community. As the busiest gateway and hub in India, Nhava Sheva has been constrained in the past by lack of facilities, which has impacted trade. We at DP World are proud to bring new capacity to this vibrant city and the fast growing economy of India.

“The new terminal will serve India for generations to come and help speed goods to market, stimulating trade, contributing to economic growth, which in turn contributes to the development of communities and individuals.”

Anil Singh, Senior Vice President & Managing Director, DP World Subcontinent said: “For the last five years, India’s premier port has been in critical need of capacity with container trade rising. The building of greater capacity is part of the port’s long term vision. Nhava Sheva (India) Gateway Terminal will provide the immediate relief that the trade community urgently requires and we at DP World are fast tracking the project to commence operations as early in 2015 as possible and we have already placed the order for the cranes that will be installed.”

Once constructed, the new terminal will add 800,000 TEUs (twenty foot equivalent container units) of container capacity to the port, and help ease congestion, as the port is currently operating beyond capacity. DP World is investing US$200 million to build the terminal.

With one of the strongest emerging economies in the world, and a burgeoning middle class population, India offers immense potential for growth. With Nhava Sheva (India) Gateway Terminal, DP World will contribute even more to India’s growth, offering customers the ability to grow and expand their business in India more efficiently.

We welcome customer bookings and enquiries on info@acegloballines.com & kiran@acegloballines.com.

The ACE Global Lines Team.
05 March 2014


Ace Global Lines DWC-LLC launches Its new "Niche Container Service" to Umm Qasr - Iraq.

After the successful launch of its “Reefer" and "Tank Container" services in 2013, Ace Global Lines DWC-LLC has now announced a new weekly service to Umm Qasr - Iraq. DP World -Jebel Ali Port with its excellent infrastructure will be used by ACE as the key transshipment hub in the region. Customers in the Indian Sub-Continent and Middle East now have the ability to secure the same “customer friendly” services from the region’s leading “Niche Carrier”. The teams at Ace Global Lines in Dubai, have proven expertise in providing Container Shipping & Logistics services to all Inland Locations inside Iraq.

This new Iraq service follows the ACE philosophy of “Simplified Solutions“ by making complex operations very simple for our Customers. Its our goal to take on the “problems” of our customers and provide them with a “stress-free” service experience. The regional trade can get in touch with our booking teams on info@acegloballines.com & mahesh@acegloballines.com

We welcome customer bookings and enquiries on info@acegloballines.com & kiran@acegloballines.com.

The ACE Global Lines Team.
April, 2014.


Ace Global Lines DWC-LLC launches the regions 1st “Food Chain Shuttle Service” between U.A.E. , Chittagong and Colombo.

Keeping up our promise to provide customers with a “simple and cost-effective” Food-Chain service out of U.A.E., Ace Global Lines DWC-LLC is proud to launch another “innovative” niche service connecting U.A.E. with the “Indian-Sub-Continent” ports of Colombo and Chittagong.

Dubai is fast growing as a key “Cold Chain” Hub, shifting focus from being just a “consumer” to a logistics enabler and key food “re-exporter” by assisting companies involved in the Cold Chain to grow their business, supported by a visionary government. The container cold transport chain is a key back-bone to promote trade in the region. Ace Global Lines DWC-LLC is proud to be part of this effort to promote the Expo 20-20 and Dubai World Central (DWC) which is perhaps one of the fastest growing Logistics Hubs in the world.

We are confident that this new service will be welcomed by our customers who will now have the benefit of dedicated shuttle service on these unique niches. The Cold Chain shuttle is also supported and complement with ACE’s latest fleet of brand-new “Dry” containers, thus enabling the food chain in both the “perishable" and "non-perishable" segments. As a triple complement, ACE’s latest fleet of ISO Tanks will also provide customers with “food-grade” tanks for liquid bulk transport of juices and other food products.

We at Ace Global Lines are energized and ready`for the growth-wave in Dubai and DWC, our historic location for Expo - 2020 …Are you ? Feel the ACE experience by getting in touch with our booking teams on info@acegloballines.com & kiran@acegloballines.com

We welcome customer bookings and enquiries on info@acegloballines.com & kiran@acegloballines.com.

The ACE Global Lines Team.
May, 2014.


Ace Global Lines DWC-LLC successfully launches the 1st “Reefer Container Shuttle“ between U.A.E. and Pakistan.

Ace Global Lines DWC-LLC, one of the fastest growing "Regional Niche Carrier" successfully launched its “ Reefer Container Shuttle “ between Pakistan and U.A.E. in December 2013. The goal for the DWC registered Ace Global Lines, is to promote the regions leading Logistics Hub of Dubai with one of the fastest shuttle service for “fresh” and “frozen” produce, that is required for the ever growing tourist population. With the launch of this much needed service, customers in Pakistan were relieved to finally have an “efficient" and “reliable" carrier to cater to their specialized Cold-Chain needs.

The ACE reefer units manufactured by Carrier, are considered to be the industry standard for balanced system design in container refrigeration. These reefer units bring our customers superior operating efficiency, precise intelligent electronic control and field-proven reliability manufactured by the world leader in transport refrigeration. This “Reefer Container Shuttle” service is a result of the ACE philosophy to provide customers with “Best-In-Class” assets, “No-compromise” on Quality and “Innovative Solutions", thus raising the service levels in the region and providing a big boost to Pakistan's Perishable Cargo Trade.

This is another promise delivered by ACE, the region’s No.1 Niche Carrier. Customers are welcome to get in touch with our booking teams on info@acegloballines.com & mayur@acegloballines.com

We welcome customer bookings and enquiries on info@acegloballines.com & kiran@acegloballines.com.

The ACE Global Lines Team.
December 2013.

Incoterms, transfer of risk and title to sue

Returning to the topic of trade terms covered in TT Talk 178 in September 2013, this article aims to clarify the concepts of risk and property (or title to the goods) and explain how the use of the Incoterms® affects the transfer of risk and property. Further, the article sets out how the transfer of risk in intrinsically linked to the issue of who can sue for loss or damage to goods.

Most of those active within shipping, freight forwarding, logistics, road haulage or related industries are familiar with Incoterms®. The use of the three letter acronyms is widespread in bills of lading and other transport documents, shipments will often be referenced by one of the terms. For a general description of the background, operation and value of these trade terms, see the earlier TT Talk article.

Fundamentally, Incoterms® ‘belong’ to the traders and merchants or buyers and sellers of goods in international trade. However, since the terms are essentially concerned with the nature of the transport arrangements, it is perhaps surprising that the evidence of what has been agreed resides in the sales contract rather than the carriage contract. Which term has been agreed is commonly also indicated in the commercial invoice, but this is not a legally binding document in the manner of a concluded contract, simply request for payment.

In domestic trade risk and property in the goods will typically pass from the seller to the buyer at the same time, normally when the goods are collected or delivered. In international sales, however, risk is necessarily separated from the passing of property. Whereas Incoterms® deal with the transfer of risk, this is not so for the transfer of property. In other words, whereas risk in a ‘shipment’ sale (involving transport by sea or inland waterway) passes when the goods are loaded on the ship, property in the goods may pass at an earlier or later stage, as agreed between the seller (exporter) and buyer (importer).

“whereas risk in a ‘shipment’ sale passes when the goods are loaded on the ship, property in the goods may pass at an earlier or later stage, as agreed between the seller and buyer” Why does this matter?
Imagine the following situation: a seller contracts with a freight forwarder for the shipment of goods from A to B. The freight forwarder acts as an NVOC and issues a bill of lading for the ocean carriage of the goods. If the goods are lost in transit, the shipper may claim for the loss. However, for the shipper to have a right to claim for the loss (‘title to sue’) he must have been on risk for the shipment. Where the goods have been sold on ‘shipment’ terms the title to sue does not remain with the shipper, even though he may have paid the freight, but with the consignee.

“for the shipper to have a right to claim for the loss he must have been on risk for the shipment” Further, if the cargo insurer indemnifies the shipper for the loss and attempts to recover against the freight forwarder, the subrogated insurer inherits the same rights as the party the insurer has indemnified (ie. the shipper) and will face the same difficulty as the shipper in establishing title to sue.

Why would a cargo insurer indemnify the shipper for such a loss? It may of course be by reason of poor attention to detail – failing to check which Incoterms® applies or overlooking the meaning of the applicable term in relation to risk – but it may also be that a cargo insurer allows an indemnification claim because the shipper has already paid the consignee for the loss. A further reason may be that the cargo policy has a coverage extension (eg. seller’s interest clause) that allows for the shipper to claim even though he was not on risk.

It may be possible to remedy the situation of who has title to sue by an assignment of rights. While the parties are free to transfer the title to sue in this manner, the party to whom the rights are assigned cannot – as with subrogation – be put in a better position than the assignor. For example, if the shipper made the initial claim and later realises that the title had vested with the consignee, the time limit for making a claim may have expired. Under the Hague-Visby Rules, notice of loss needs to be given in writing ‘before or at the time of the removal of the goods into the custody of the person entitled to delivery… or, if the loss or damage be not apparent, within three days’ to avoid a presumption that the goods were delivered sound. If the wrong party has claimed within this time period a subsequent assignment of rights does not ‘mend’ any other aspect of the claim. Thus, if a timely claim cannot still be made, the presumption may stand.

For a freight forwarder, a related area potentially fraught with danger is where, either erroneously or out of an intention to be generous with a customer, he accepts a claim from a party not on risk for the transit – any subsequent recovery against the actual carrier may be significantly prejudiced.

“in international trade the fact that a party may own the goods does not automatically give that party title to claim for any loss or damage”

In conclusion, in international trade the fact that a party may own or have ‘title to’ the goods does not automatically give that party title to sue or to claim for any loss or damage. This is determined by the risk allocation incorporated through Incoterms® into the sale contract that governs relations between the seller and the buyer. If a copy of the sale contract is not available, the commercial invoice will normally state which term has been agreed. Finally, the party who has paid the freight is not necessarily on risk for the goods in transit – and therefore may not be entitled to claim for the loss or damage to the goods.

The ACE Global Lines Team.
May, 2014.


India’s Shipping Minister Lays Foundation Stone For Dp World’s New Terminal At Jawaharlal Nehru Port

Mumbai, India, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 05 March 2014:- A major milestone in the development of the new DP World terminal at India’s premier gateway port, Jawaharlal Nehru Port, was achieved today with the ceremonial laying of the foundation stone by the Honourable Minister of Shipping Shri GK Vasan

The ceremony at the Nhava Sheva (India) Gateway Terminal site was held in the presence of the Honourable Minister of State for Shipping, Shri Milind Deora, the Chairman DP World, HE Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem, and HE Shri NN Kumar, Chairman of Jawaharlal Nehru Port, along with dignitaries from the Government of India, senior members of Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust and DP World, and the Indian trade community.

HE Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem, Chairman, DP World, said: “Today is an important milestone for us and we thank the Honourable Minister Shri GK Vasan for laying the foundation stone for the Nhava Sheva (India) Gateway Terminal. The new development would not have been possible without the dedication and commitment of the Government of India to India’s trade community. As the busiest gateway and hub in India, Nhava Sheva has been constrained in the past by lack of facilities, which has impacted trade. We at DP World are proud to bring new capacity to this vibrant city and the fast growing economy of India.

“The new terminal will serve India for generations to come and help speed goods to market, stimulating trade, contributing to economic growth, which in turn contributes to the development of communities and individuals.”

Anil Singh, Senior Vice President & Managing Director, DP World Subcontinent said: “For the last five years, India’s premier port has been in critical need of capacity with container trade rising. The building of greater capacity is part of the port’s long term vision. Nhava Sheva (India) Gateway Terminal will provide the immediate relief that the trade community urgently requires and we at DP World are fast tracking the project to commence operations as early in 2015 as possible and we have already placed the order for the cranes that will be installed.”

Once constructed, the new terminal will add 800,000 TEUs (twenty foot equivalent container units) of container capacity to the port, and help ease congestion, as the port is currently operating beyond capacity. DP World is investing US$200 million to build the terminal.

With one of the strongest emerging economies in the world, and a burgeoning middle class population, India offers immense potential for growth. With Nhava Sheva (India) Gateway Terminal, DP World will contribute even more to India’s growth, offering customers the ability to grow and expand their business in India more efficiently.

The ACE Global Lines Team.
05 March


Indonesia prospects brighten as poll predicts 5.6pc GDP growth

INDONESIA's economic prospects appear to be brightening as inflation slows and a Reuters poll shows expectations of a 5.6 per cent increase in GDP growth.

"We are looking for a 1Q real GDP growth print of 5.6 per cent year-on-year, driven by a combination of weak investment growth but resilient private consumption spending, thanks to pre-election spending," Credit Suisse said in a research note. Exports rose 1.24 per cent from a year earlier, bolstered by stronger palm oil shipments and demand from China and Japan. The median forecast of analysts was for a drop of 1.3 per cent. Imports fell 2.34 per cent.

source: www.schednet.com


SCFI shows Asia-Europe rates highest since February - US$1,305/TEU

THE Shanghai Containerised Freight Index (SCFI), all-in spot rate from Shanghai to northern Europe increased by US$221 compared with a week earlier to reach $1,305 per TEU, the highest since mid-February.

Shanghai to Mediterranean services had prices surge $214 in a week to $1,458 per TEU. Average weekly prices were $1,547 per TEU this year compared with $1,199 per TEU last year. Carriers levied a general rate increase averaging $500 per TEU from May 1, though some carriers put it off till May 15. But carrier confidence is growing with reports that space is tightening and utilisation is more than 90 per cent. Last week, there was an unexpected jump in prices on the trade lane, with brokers suggesting a surge in cargo had caused certain carriers to form container roll pools because of a lack of space on ships. On the transpacific trade lane, prices for cargo moving from Asia to the US west coast this week slipped $9 week to week to $1,913 per FEU, and to the east coast prices stayed at the same level as a week earlier at $3,328 per FEU.

source: www.schednet.com


TT Talk - Safety first - the need for good induction procedures

The ‘safety first’ message seems to be getting through. At industry conferences, TT Club has often felt alone speaking about safety – and the subject itself has frequently been accommodated at the end of the schedule. In that context at least, safety definitely did not come first. Happily, the culture in operations and at conferences seems to have changed.

It has not been uncommon in the past, for the observant visitor to a terminal facility to notice a prominent sign placed at the main gate alerting to the need for safety or lauding the implemented safety culture. The reality, once past the gate though, could well have appeared quite different. In too many instances it would seem that operational requirements and pressures took precedence, and safety was forgotten.

Happily, things have largely changed. The industry is now openly discussing safety, both within operations and also at trade events – even where economics may be the key strategic issue for many. For the most part, operators have been won over by the evidence that safety not only save lives but also improves productivity and profitability; the safest terminals can be demonstrated to be the most efficient and productive.

“apart from improvements to an operational ‘bottom line’, there are many very good reasons for a management to focus on saving lives”

Of course, apart from improvements to an operational ‘bottom line’, there are many very good reasons for a management to focus on saving lives. However, even with a noticeable cultural shift, people continue to be injured. Unfortunately injuries and fatalities will not simply disappear overnight. There is still much work to be done on safety awareness, implementing safer procedures and installing safer technologies and equipment. Analysis by the TT Club of incidents occurring within the port environment indicates that 80% of injury and fatality costs are caused by operators of handling equipment and other vehicles. All too often pedestrians are run over by trucks or struck by reversing handling equipment. Other common incidents on terminals include truck overturns, and containers being dislodged from the stack and landing on trucks or pedestrians.

Technology may help, induction training is critical

While the root causes of such incidents are varied and complex, the installation of technology can help – rear view cameras and anti-collision sensors on mobile equipment; RFID (radio frequency identification) tags attached to protective equipment supplied to pedestrians and installed on mobile equipment; stack profiling on cranes to prevent them striking containers. All of these will prevent incidents, as will procedures such as one-way traffic flows, limiting vehicles and pedestrians in the yard, and mandating a safe area for truckers to open and close twistlocks. These are all matters that the Club has highlighted previously. Fundamental, however, is enforcing good site safety induction procedures.

Induction works best in reducing incidents because it is third parties in terminals that are most at risk. The statistics show that external truck drivers are the ones who are injured most commonly. They enter danger areas or alight from their trucks when and where they shouldn’t. Reliance on signage at the main gate is insufficient; familiarity or momentary inattention may render such signs ineffective, and it is unfortunate indeed if this only becomes apparent during litigation. Adequate site safety inductions for everyone entering the facility are required. It is equally important, of course, not to neglect regular safety training for employees, alongside consistent enforcement.

“Adequate site safety inductions for everyone entering the facility are required”

Subject to the size and complexity of the facility, such induction is best achieved face to face, through a training course similar to those provided to employees at the terminal facility. This can most readily be implemented for drivers who regularly are presenting themselves at the terminal. On completion of the course, and following success in a closing test, drivers should receive a card with their name, photo, training date and, importantly, an expiry date. The process also requires that drivers are denied entry without a valid card.

An alternative, where face to face is impractical in the scenario that too many drivers are irregular or ‘one-off’ visitors, can be installation of computer terminal kiosks. Here, drivers complete on-line type training via a Q&A, which verifies understanding and produces a printed slip, itself required to gain entry. An effective variant on this, when on-site training courses are impractical, may be to require those planning to visit a terminal to complete an on-line safety training course and then print a certificate with which to gain entry. The flaw in the variant is the inability to verify identity.

Safety culture needs consistent enforcement

Proper induction procedures will help minimise accidents regardless of the size of facility. Furthermore, should a serious injury or fatality occur, where appropriate induction procedures are in place the terminal operator is likely to face reduced exposure to workplace safety penalties and an improved defensive position for any compensation claim.

“A thorough safety culture will equally ensure that all those on site comply with procedures”

The main aim remains to prevent injuries of all kinds. No visitor should enter a terminal without receiving a proper safety induction. Employees and contractors deserve parallel safety treatment and enforcement. A sign at the gate, perhaps viewed as better than nothing, is not adequate. Controlling access to those who are trained, whether face to face or by other means, is really necessary for what should be considered as ‘industrial’ sites. A thorough safety culture will equally ensure that all those on site comply with procedures.

Ace Global Lines DWC-LLC is insured by the worlds leading Insurer / TT CLUB.

Source: TT Talk 186
Date: 31/03/2014


Transpacific carriers chase peak season surcharge of US$400/FEU

TRANSPACIFIC container shipping lines are introducing a peak season surcharge of US$400 per FEU for all shipments, effective June 15 as carriers experience a surge in eastbound bookings from Asia to the US.

The announcement follows a general rate increase (GRI) of $300 per FEU to the US west coast and $400 to all other US destinations from May 15 "to further help offset rate erosion seen in recent months.” "Carriers continue to play catch-up on rates, which have been stagnant since 2011," said TSA executive administrator Brian Conrad. The peak season surcharge is intended "to cover contingencies in the event of an earlier than usual peak season - diversifying port gateways, rerouting inland traffic, leasing extra equipment". reported Lloyd's List. "Modest revenue gains from recent GRIs will not be adequate to pay for upgraded services to meet likely demand surges in the coming months," said Mr Conrad. Stronger volumes began in January and are expected to continue into the second half of 2014, with vessel utilisation in the mid-90 per cent range for shipments moving via the west coast, and in the high-90 per cent to the east and Gulf coasts. The Shanghai Containerised Freight Index shows that spot rates for cargo moving from China to the US west coast were at $1,913 per FEU at the beginning of May, less than $2,000 per loaded FEU a year earlier.

source: www.schednet.com


TT Talk - IMDG Code Amendment 36-12 has become mandatory

Anecdotal information suggests that some in the maritime supply chain are using out of date dangerous goods data. Inspections evidence that non-compliance continues to be too high. Incidents demonstrate the results. TT Club recommends a New Year resolution: implement the new IMDG amendment and ensure that goods are properly classified, marked, packed and declared.

The IMDG Code follows a two year cycle of amendments and enforcement. The latest Amendment (36-12) was adopted by the Maritime Safety Council (MSC) of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) at its 90th session in London in May 2012.

It could be applied on a voluntary basis from 1 January 2013 and the key changes in this amendment were outlined in TT Talk 167 issued in December 2012. This Amendment of the Code became mandatory from 1 January 2014 and will remain so until 1 January 2016.

“Amendment 36-12 of the IMDG Code became mandatory from 1 January 2014 and will remain so until 1 January 2016”

The review continues
The work on the next amendment (37-14) is already well advanced, under the control of the relevant IMO sub-committee of the MSC, historically known as Dangerous Goods, Solid Cargoes and Containers (DSC), now re-organised into Carriage of Cargoes and Containers (CCC).

This sub-committee meets at least once a year, usually in September, and has to consider sometimes hundreds of submissions from member states and organisations in consultative status. These latter comprise many Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO’s) as diverse as ICHCA International – of whom TT Club are members and regular participants with the ICHCA delegation – to the International Paint & Printing Ink Council, through organisations such as Greenpeace and the Institute of International Container Lessors.

Amendment 37-14, if all goes to plan will be adopted by MSC in May 2014 and will be available to be applied on a voluntary basis from January 2015.

Aiming at harmonisation
Many delegations to IMO have been working on harmonisation across the intermodal supply chain and bringing the various modal Regulations closer together. Everything stems from the UN’s ‘Model Regulations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods’ (known as the Orange Book) as developed by the renamed ‘Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods and on the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals’.

Inevitably, the risk factors relating to dangerous goods differ through the intermodal supply chain. As a result, some variance in the regulations can be expected. However, difficulties can arise at the point of interface between the Codes for each form of transport (such as IMDG for sea, ADR for road, RID for rail, ADN for European Waterways and IATA DGR for air) where specific requirements have been developed for certain goods. Now however there are renewed efforts to move towards the ‘harmonisation’ that the UN envisaged and every session of DSC (now CCC) sees papers on this subject. In fact, many of the detailed changes that come with each Amendment that is issued arise because of this harmonisation.

“Difficulties can arise at the point of interface between the Codes for each form of transport where specific requirements have been developed for certain goods”

Identifying non-compliance

In terms of non-compliance with the IMDG Code there have been renewed calls, notably from International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) for national Competent Authorities to make use of their ability to report serious infringements back to IMO and other authorities and share information on non-declared or mis-declared dangerous goods between each other. ICS has been asked to present concrete proposals to the first meeting of CCC in September this year.

Of course this is also something that is increasingly being reported through the CINS-net programme and offers useful advice and trends on dangerous goods incidents to shippers and carriers in membership.

Annual reporting from the 170 or so national Competent Authorities to IMO over the last decade has frankly been disappointing given concerns over the high incidence of non-compliance observed through accidents and incident reporting initiatives, such as the liner operators’ Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS). At the IMO committee meeting in September 2013, only seven reports were made, in respect of just over 70,000 containers – far less than 0.1% of laden movements. And the findings are hardly comforting… on average over the last decade more than 15% of the inspections have found deficiencies. Of these, over the same period, 36% related to ‘placarding and marking’ (the visual alert to danger) and 21%, significantly, to ‘securing and stowage inside the unit’.

The uncomfortable reality is that most of these ‘IMO’ inspections are on containers declared to be packed with dangerous goods. Ship casualties arising from explosions and fires over the same period have commonly established that cargoes not declared as dangerous caused or exacerbated the loss. It is generally accepted that declared dangerous goods shipments comprise about 10% of all container movements; combining the non-compliance from inspected dangerous goods movements with non-declared shipments paints a disturbing picture.

“Ship casualties arising from explosions and fires have commonly established that cargoes not declared as dangerous caused or exacerbated the loss”

The importance of effective packing

Indeed, the CINS initiative has reported that over 80% of incidents relate to cargo that is dangerous, and 25% are caused by mis-declaration and a further 35% relate to poor or incorrect packing. The liner carrier membership of the CINS Organisation accounts for about 60% of maritime container movements (source: Alphaliner). While the database is in its infancy, the ability to identify trends and provide alerts to emerging risks is already compelling. The incidents over the last twelve months fully justify this safety-based collaboration.

It is clear that the IMDG Code alone will not address these continuing issues of non-compliance and the recently concluded work on the revised ILO/IMO/UNECE Code of Practice on Packing of CTUs will help if it can be successfully promulgated in an easy to understand format to provide good practice guidance to all packers and shippers. Equally, every party involved in the logistics supply chain will need to be aware of their responsibilities for their portion in the flow of goods.

Ace Global Lines DWC-LLC is insured by the worlds leading Insurer / TT CLUB.

Date: 31/12/2013
Source: TT Talk 183

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